Cut Industrially Added Fructose: Not Fruit

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Anti-sugar advocates seem to have taken their sugar obsessions to the next level by completely cutting out any type of sugar. To do this many are also avoiding fruit, as this contains naturally occurring fructose/fruit sugar. While many agree we could do with less sugar, particularly added fructose, we should be careful not to go overboard. The story on whether sugar may be harmful and at what dosage is complex and dependent on many variables. According to current research it is just the industrially added fructose that may be damaging, not naturally occurring fructose. Check out this video to find out why…



 

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Mintel: Stevia More Then a Calorie Free Sweetener

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stevia-plant-ccThe stevia market seems to be maturing as stevia is becoming increasingly mainstream. After beverage giants like Coca-Cola and PepsiCo embraced this sweet calorie free gift from nature, now other companies are following suit. Heinz and Lipton are too jumping on the bandwagon by investing in stevia.

But according to BeverageDaily.com and Mintel there is a whole lot more potential for steiva out there. Currently only stevia’s steviol glycosides, which are up to 300 times sweeter then sugar, are used to sweeten food and beverages. They are used as an additive and lack some of the potentially positive health benefits ‘whole’ stevia extracts could offer. Some of its benefits include alleviating liver and kidney damage, inducing hypoglycemic effect by reducing glucose and insulin levels, and improving antioxidant levels in rat livers. In Brazil stevia is also used to treat diabetes.

Laura-Daisy Jones, Mintel global food science analyst, therefore argues that stevia has a whole lot more potential and comments: ”For now, stevia will remain popular as a no-calorie, ‘natural’ source of sweetness. However, as more evidence reveals stevia’s full nutritional benefits, work to retain these active components during its extraction process could mean in the future that stevia-based sweetener may be able to combine functional health benefits alongside their reduced offer of calorie-free sweetness,” 

The one major issue holding this back seems to be regulatory approval. Both the US and Europe have only approved highly refined stevia extracts to date, which can only be used as a food additive. Considering the complex regulatory regime in the US and Europe alone getting stevia to be approved as a whole leaf ingredient along with the health claim will probably be a long crusade.

Interestingly thought this has not halted market acceptance of stevia. It is undeniable that the market is craving a need for a natural and zero-calorie sweetener, especially in many developed regions with high rates of obesity and diabetes. Stevia has long ventured from its local grounds such as Paraguay Brazil and Japan. The proof is in the pudding as product launches containing stevia increased with 732% globally between 2009-2013. Other factors which are leading to its broader market acceptance are improvements in stevia’s taste profile due to better breeding and refining techniques along with increasing distrust of artificial sweeteners by consumers. Also be sure to see what Dr. Paul Haider has to say about stevia’s potential health benefits…



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60 Days on Sugar

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After FedUp the movie we have a new ‘sugar sweet’ movie coming up: That Sugar Film. News.com.au reported that filmmaker and TV actor Damon Gameau vows to follow a strict diet of ”healthy”, low-fat food with high sugar content. It seems he is stepping in the footsteps of Morgan Spurloc, who in 2005 scored a major hit with the film Super Size Me were he documented his 60 day McDonald’s diet.

Gameau told Yahoo: ”I had no soft drink, chocolate, ice cream or confectionery,”. He continues ”All the sugars that I was eating were found in perceived healthy foods, so low-fat yogurts, and muesli bars, and cereals, and fruit juices, sports drinks (…) these kind of things that often parents would give their kids thinking they’re doing the right thing.”

According to News.com.au Gameau ended up consuming about 40 teaspoons of sugar a day, comparable to what the average teenager consumes today. After three weeks he became moody and sluggish and just like Morgan Spurloc, Damon Gameau visited the doctor. The news wasen’t much better as he gave him a shocking diagnosis: He was beginning to develop fatty liver disease, of which potential liver failure could be its severest outcome according to  Mayo Clinic.

With That Sugar Film Gameau tries to raise awareness, especially for parents, not to be deceived by foods that claim to be healthy. The movie is due to be released in Australia on Feburary 2015. No dates have been set yet for either a EU or US release.



 

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Damaging Effects of Sugar Hit Hollywood

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According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), over 80% of the 600.000 food products found in US supermarkets contain added sugar. The added sugar often goes unnoticed, as it’s obscured by its 56 different aliases. Findings like the above inspired the makers of the movie Fed Up to draw attention to the damaging effect our ‘unnoticed’ excessive sugar intake may have on us. The central argument of the movie centers around the idea that we cannot necessarily exercise our way out of obesity, and that ‘a calorie is not a calorie‘. Check out the trailer below and if you like it, we did find this link were you can watch the entire movie for free.



 

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Italian Chef Enraged After Insult From Blonde TV Hostess!

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We all know tastes are extremely subjective and often culturally ingrained. It is also a debate that keeps on coming up with stevia as countless parties are working towards making it taste as close to sugar as possible. This hilarious video shows that with some you better not argue over taste!



 

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Sugar: The Bitter Truth

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”Robert H. Lustig, MD, UCSF Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology, explores the damage caused by sugary foods. He argues that fructose (too much) and fiber (not enough) appear to be cornerstones of the obesity epidemic through their effects on insulin.” 



 

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